The populist vision /

The Populist Vision is about how Americans responded to wrenching changes in the national and global economy. In the late nineteenth century, the telegraph and steam power made America and the world a much smaller place. The new technologies also made possible large-scale bureaucratic organization a... Full description

Main Author: Postel, Charles.
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
Subjects:
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245 1 4 |a The populist vision /  |c Charles Postel. 
260 |a Oxford ;  |a New York :  |b Oxford University Press,  |c 2007. 
300 |a xiv, 397 pages :  |b illustrations ;  |c 24 cm 
336 |a text  |b txt  |2 rdacontent 
337 |a unmediated  |b n  |2 rdamedia 
338 |a volume  |b nc  |2 rdacarrier 
504 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages 349-377) and index. 
505 0 |a Modern times -- I: Farmers -- Push and energy : boosterism and rural reform -- Knowledge and power : machinery of modern education -- A better woman : independence of thought and action -- A farmers' trust : cooperative economies of scale -- II: Populists -- Business politics : state models and political frameworks -- Race progress : shaping a new racial order -- Confederation : urban, labor, and nonconformist reform -- Shrine of science : innovation in populist faith -- Conclusion : populist defeat and its meaning. 
520 |a The Populist Vision is about how Americans responded to wrenching changes in the national and global economy. In the late nineteenth century, the telegraph and steam power made America and the world a much smaller place. The new technologies also made possible large-scale bureaucratic organization and centralization. Corporations grew exponentially and the rich amassed great fortunes. Those on the short end of these changes responded in the Populist revolt, one of the most effective challenges to corporate power in American history. But what did Populism represent? Half a century ago, scholars such as Richard Hofstadter portrayed the Populist movement as an irrational response of backward-looking farmers to the challenges of modernity. Since then, historians have largely restored Populism's good name. But in so doing, they have sustained a romantic notion of Populism as the resistance movement of tradition-based and pre-modern communities to a modern and commercial society, or even a counterforce to the Enlightenment ideals of innovation and progress. Postel's work marks a departure. He argues that the Populists understood themselves as, and were in fact, modern people. Farmer Populists strove to use the new innovations for their own ends. They sought scientific and technical knowledge, formed highly centralized organizations, launched large-scale cooperative businesses, and pressed for state-centered reforms on the model of the nation's most elaborate bureaucracy--the Postal Service. Hundreds of thousands of Populist farm women sought education, employment in schools and offices, and a more modern life. Miners, railroad workers, and other labor Populists joined with farmers to give impetus to the regulatory state. Activists from Chicago, San Francisco, and other urban centers lent the movement an especially modern tone. Modernity was also menacing, as the ethos of racial progress influenced white Populists in their pursuit of racial segregation and Chinese exclusion. The Populist Vision offers a broad reassessment. Working extensively with primary sources, it looks at Populism as a national movement, taking into account both the leaders and the led. It focuses on farmers but also wage-earners and bohemian urbanites. It examines topics from technology, business, and women's rights, to government, race, and religion. At the dawn of the twenty-first century, business and political leaders are claiming that critics of their new structures of corporate control represent anti-modern attitudes towards the new realities of globalization. The Populist experience puts into question such claims about who is modern and who is not. And it suggests that modern society is not a given but is shaped by men and women who pursue alternative visions of what the modern world should be. 
651 0 |a United States  |x Politics and government  |y 1865-1900. 
650 0 |a Populism  |z United States  |x History  |y 19th century. 
650 0 |a Social movements  |z United States  |x History  |y 19th century. 
650 0 |a Farmers  |x Political activity  |z United States  |x History  |y 19th century. 
650 0 |a Working class  |x Political activity  |z United States  |x History  |y 19th century. 
650 0 |a Middle class  |x Political activity  |z United States  |x History  |y 19th century. 
651 0 |a United States  |x Social conditions  |y 1865-1918. 
650 0 |a Capitalism  |z United States  |x History  |y 19th century. 
651 0 |a United States  |x Economic conditions  |y 1865-1918. 
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