The Storm breaks how Darwin linked plant and animal studies /

Today his name is closely associated with human evolution. Why, then, was Charles Darwin such a tireless observer of plants? This program illustrates Darwin's quest to further support his assertions in On the Origin of Species using the familiar surroundings of his garden. Science interpreter Jim Do... Full description

Corporate Author: Films for the Humanities & Sciences (Firm)
Other Authors: Films Media Group., Open University.
Language: English
Published: New York, N.Y. : Films Media Group, [2009], c2008.
Series: In Darwin's garden.
Subjects:
Online Access: Part of the Films on Demand collection.
Summary: Today his name is closely associated with human evolution. Why, then, was Charles Darwin such a tireless observer of plants? This program illustrates Darwin's quest to further support his assertions in On the Origin of Species using the familiar surroundings of his garden. Science interpreter Jim Doherty guides viewers through Darwin's studies of insect-eating plants, including the common sundew and the Venus flytrap. Then he re-creates the means by which Darwin monitored climbing plants, contemplated the sexual nature of plants and flowers, and investigated cross-fertilization. Showing how these botanical studies informed Darwin's view of all living things, the program culminates in an overview of the 1860 Oxford debate on the merits of his ideas.
Item Description: Encoded with permission for digital streaming by Films Media Group on Nov. 06, 2009.
Films on Demand is distributed by Films Media Group for Films for the Humanities & Sciences, Cambridge Educational, Meridian Education, and Shopware.
Physical Description: 1 streaming video file (59 min.) : sd., col., digital file.
Format: Mode of access: Internet.
System requirements: FOD playback platform.
Access: Access requires authentication through Films on Demand.